MEET ELSY’S NEWEST TEAM MEMBER, NATALIE SKRAMSTAD!

MEET ELSY’S NEWEST TEAM MEMBER, NATALIE SKRAMSTAD!

by Elsy Studios

Natalie Skramstad Interior Designer

We are thrilled to welcome Natalie Skramstad to our interior design team this month! Natalie joins Elsy Studios with an extensive background in design, project management and client service.

In her previous position, Natalie primarily focused on interior design for multifamily communities and model homes. During her time there, she honed her craft while developing floorplans and elevations for furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) presentation packages.

We saw tremendous value in Natalie’s journey to Elsy. For a while now, we’ve been seeing the lines between commercial, residential and hospitality design blurring. This is due, in part, to shifts in the way we live and work.

According to a study by the New York Times, 43% of employed Americans work from home at least part of the time, driving a shift in the way both homes and workspaces are designed. Additionally, in a tight labor market, companies are using the design of their offices to attract and keep top talent. The space has to feel special – memorable.

In our work with clients across industries – from forward-thinking tech companies to more traditional law and accounting offices – we’re seeing this desire for blended space design. Happily, that’s exactly the experience Natalie brings to our team.

“I’ve always seen the role of interior designer as an opportunity to create unique experiences, and I believe that applies across project types, whether it’s a model home, an office space or a new hotel,” Natalie told us. “I was drawn to Elsy because of the care this team clearly puts into making sure each space is a true reflection of that client’s wants and needs. They take the time to think through every aspect of the experience, and it shows in the end result. I’m excited to grow my creativity in this environment!”

We look forward to adding Natalie’s perspective and expertise to our commercial client teams!

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LOOK OUTSIDE FOR INSPIRATION INSIDE

LOOK OUTSIDE FOR INSPIRATION INSIDE

by Rachel Grissop

Earth Day is a good reminder to all of us to consider our impact on and our connection to our planet and to nature. As designers, not only do we have a responsibility to create spaces that are good for people – that inspire, and support health and happiness – we also have a responsibility to consider the legacy our designs leave. That can take many forms – from using more sustainable or recycled materials to bringing natural elements into the design to provide people with stronger connections to nature.

Liberty Media: Use of a plant wall and natural stone and wood finishes creates an indoor ‘outdoor space’ with playful furniture and gathering areas that connect people back to nature.

Camp BowWow: Sustainable wood and animal-friendly (low VOC/non-toxic) finishes allow two- and four-legged clients to utilize the space to its fullest and bring the animal element of nature indoors.

Solidifi, a Real Matters Company: Wide open vistas allow for uninterrupted views of the outdoors while an art piece by a local artist/photographer highlights the native aspen trees, further pulling nature inside in an unobtrusive yet enveloping way.

Camp BowWow: Sustainable wood and animal-friendly (low VOC/non-toxic) finishes allow two- and four-legged clients to utilize the space to its fullest and bring the animal element of nature indoors.

Looking Ahead

As we continue to consider our impact, it’s important that the design industry take a leadership role in advancing conversations on materials, waste and the adaptability of the designs we create (e.g., it’s more sustainable to create spaces that can adapt without demolition). It’s one more reason why good design is so crucial – it tends to last.

We’re also encouraged to see an increased focus on design that takes its cues from nature. Nature is good for us, and by consciously including natural elements in our interior design – known as biophilic design – we can help people reconnect with those benefits.

Nature is also a great teacher. With biomimicry we’re seeing incredible potential as technology and design converge to bring about innovation by drawing inspiration from biological and natural components and processes. The approach can be seen everywhere from the tech industry to building products, architecture to fashion.

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WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE AN INTERIOR DESIGNER?

Inspirato lounge, a commercial interior design portfolio project from Elsy

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE AN INTERIOR DESIGNER?

by Carmen Schechinger

When people think of interior design, they often think about picking out paint colors, or selecting furniture and artwork. The truth is, there’s a great deal more to the profession, and it takes more than a business card to call yourself an interior designer. Education, a certain level of experience – there’s even a test!

The common misconceptions about the role of an interior designer recently led the Council for Interior Design Qualification (CIDQ) to release an updated definition of interior design to further clarify what the profession actually entails.

Under the updated definition, professional interior designers are distinguished by their successful fulfillment of several criteria including:

  • Education – Majority have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in interior design or interior architecture.
  • Experience – Minimum two years practice in the field.
  • Examination – NCIDQ Examination and Certification, which includes verifying competent application of building systems, codes and construction standards.

So why does it matter how we define what we do?

Well, Denver is changing – fast. Our growing economy and booming population have driven a massive surge in construction as businesses relocate or expand. With so many companies looking at the investment of building an office space that will attract and retain employees, there is greater demand for qualified professional consultants to help them get their space right. The aesthetic of the Mile High City is being shaped every day, so the design of these interior spaces matters.

Good design is about more than how a space looks. It’s also about how it works. A qualified interior design team should make sure the design is as smart as it is beautiful. That it supports the health, safety, wellbeing and productivity of building occupants as well as enhances the human experience. That the space is compliant with building codes (of which there are many) and that it makes sense in the context of the building’s architecture.

As qualified interior designers, we guide with our clients from concept through delivery and beyond. We manage budgets, contracts, schedules, consultants, staffing and resources. Our clients rely on us for detailed and accurate drawings that directly impact the construction of the space. They expect us to know what to look for during construction and to work with the project team to get any issues addressed quickly. This all requires a level of expertise that only comes through education and experience.

So while it might not seem like a big distinction between “designer” and “decorator” on the surface, the old adage “It’s what’s on the inside that counts” applies in a big way to the design of your space.

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